How To Tie The Perfect Knot In Braided Fishing Line

knot

You must know how to tie the perfect knot if you’re fishing with a braided fishing line. Braided line is different from monofilament in that it has a weave pattern. You can’t just tie a standard knot and be done with it. It would help if you had special knots for braided lines to keep everything secure and prevent your line from unraveling or fraying when you cast. Once you learn how to tie the perfect knot in a braided fishing line, you can use that knowledge on any braid and for any fishing—saltwater, freshwater, ice fishing, or artificial lures. It’s not just about the fish; it’s about how effectively you catch them so you can enjoy them later!


Braid vs. Monofilament: What’s the difference?

A braided fishing line is made from many thin strands of monofilament line knitted together. So, it has many of the same properties as monofilament, like its strength and flexibility, but will last longer and is more resistant to UV damage. Because it’s made of thinner lines twisted together, it is much more resistant to abrasion and can withstand more abuse. On the other hand, the monofilament fishing line is stronger when it’s made of larger diameters. That means you can use a lighter and smaller reel and still reel in big fish. Monofilament is also less expensive than braid.


Why does braided line matter?

Braided fishing line is more durable and lasts longer than monofilament fishing line. It is less porous and less likely to get snagged on coral or weeds and become tangled. You can use a smaller diameter of braid when compared to monofilament, allowing you to use a smaller and lighter reel. That is especially useful when ice fishing, as you need to minimize the weight on the line. Because braid is less porous than monofilament, it retains less water. That can be helpful when fishing in murky water like in a bay.


The One Way Knot

The one-way knot is most commonly used when connecting two pieces of braid in a parallel fashion. That is a quick and easy method, but the knot can come undone if you aggressively fight a fish or reel in too fast. Start by creating a loop at one end of your braid with the tip facing you. Then, make another loop at the other end of the braid with the tip facing away from you. Bring the first loop through your second loop and tighten it with your fingers.


The Uni-knot

The uni-knot is best for attaching a swivel to your line when fishing with lures and for attaching your line to a leader. It is a quick and easy knot to tie, but be careful not to over-tighten. An over-tightened uni-knot can decrease your line’s strength by 50%. Make a loop at the end of your line and pass the loop through the eye of your swivel and back through the loop. Pull the line to tighten the loop and then give the loop another half-twist.


The Double Uni-knot

The double uni-knot is best used when attaching a leader to your line. You can also use it to tie two pieces of braid together by forming two loops. If you use it to tie two pieces together, leave enough line at each end so you can tie the uni-knot later if needed. Start by making a loop at one end of your line with the tip facing you. Then, make a loop with the tip facing you at the other end of the line. Next, pass the first loop through the second loop and tighten it with your fingers.


The Anchor Knot

The anchor knot is best used when fishing with braided lines in a straight fashion. This knot is easy to tie and is not as likely to come undone as the one-way knot, but it does reduce the strength of your line by about 20%. Start by making a loop at each end of your braid with the tip facing towards you. Next, make a loop at one end of your braid with the tip facing you. Then, pass the loop at the end with the tip facing away from you through the loop at the other end with the tip facing towards you. Finally, tighten the knot with your fingers.


Summary

A braided fishing line is stronger and more durable than a monofilament line and is made from thinner strands woven together. Different knots to use with braided lines depending on your setups, such as the one-way knot, uni-knot, and anchor knot. Braided line is more expensive than monofilament, but it lasts longer and is less porous, meaning it’s less likely to get snags, tangles, and UV damage. A Perfect knot in a braided fishing line will keep it from fraying or coming loose during the fight.

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