How To Tie Fishing Lures: The Ultimate Guide

tie-fishing-lures

Fishing lures are the primary tools used by anglers to catch fish. Many fishermen completely ignore using lures until they eventually become exhausted from casting artificial baits over and over again without any responses from the fish. Of course, there are always going to be fish that prefer natural bait over an artificial lure. However, this is not to say that artificial lures don’t have their advantages as well. After all, we wouldn’t have so many fishing books, websites, and videos if it weren’t for the effectiveness of fishing lures. That being said, check out our ultimate guide on how to tie fishing lures so that you can improve your catch rate next time you go out with your rod and tackle.


How to Choose the Right Lure for Your Fishing Trip

The lure you choose will depend on a wide variety of factors. First, you need to consider the type of fish you’re after. For example, if you’re fishing for large-mouth bass, you’ll be better off using an artificial lure that mimics an insect like a crayfish or dragonfly. On the other hand, if you’re fishing for trout, an artificial lure that closely mimics a small crayfish, minnow, or worm is a better option. Next, you need to consider the current and wind conditions. For example, if there are strong winds, you’ll want to use a lure that floats. If there’s a lot of current in the water, you’ll want to use a lure that sinks. You also need to consider the water depth. If you’re going after fish in shallow water, something like a top-water lure is a good choice.


Types of Fishing Lures

Crank-baits - these lures typically have large, round bodies with a concave head. They’re designed to be cast into the water and then quickly cranked. They’re an effective lure for fishing for bass and pan-fish in both fresh and saltwater. Jig - Jigs are an excellent lure for fishing for a wide variety of fish. They’re often used to fish for walleye, bass, pike, and salmon. Spinners - Spinning lures are often used when fishing for bass. They’re typically cast into the water and then reeled in quickly, often with a helicopter motion. Spoons - These lures are designed to be cast out into the water and then quickly reeled in. They’re often used to fish for bass, trout, pike, and salmon.


How to Tie a Slip Float

This lure is typically used when fishing for trout and pike. It’s tied by taking a 6-foot length of 4- or 6-pound test line and then tying a small swivel on each end, leaving enough line to attach the lure to your fishing line. Next, take a 6-inch length of line and tie a loop on one end and a barrel knot on the other. Take a 2-inch length of line and wrap it once around the looped end. Then, take the remaining line and wrap it around the barrel knot, leaving 2 inches on the other side. Finally, take the looped end and wrap it around the barrel knot, leaving the 2-inch line end inside the loop. Place a small weight on the end of the line. This slip float can be used to fish for pan-fish, trout, and pike.


How to Tie a Spoon Lure

A spoon lure is designed to be cast into the water and then reeled in quickly. They’re often used to fish for large-mouth bass and bluegill. To tie this lure, you’ll need a 5- to 6-foot length of a 4- or 6-pound test line. Then, take a 3-inch length of line and tie a swivel on each end. Next, take a 1-foot length of line and tie a barrel knot near the end. Take a 2-inch length of line and wrap it around the barrel knot, leaving 2 inches on the other side. Take the remaining line and wrap it around the barrel knot again, leaving 2 inches of line on the other side. Then, wrap the 2-inch line around the barrel knot again, leaving 2 inches of line on the other side. Place a small weight on the end of the line. This spoon lure can be fished for large-mouth bass and bluegill.


How to Tie a Butterfly Lure

A butterfly lure is designed to be cast into the water and then slowly reeled in. It’s often used to fish for large-mouth bass and bluegill. To tie this lure, take a 5- to 6-foot length of a 4- or 6-pound test line. Then, take a 3-inch length of line and tie a swivel on each end. Next, take a 1-foot length of line and tie a barrel knot near the end. Take a 2-inch length of line and wrap it around the barrel knot, leaving 2 inches on the other side. Take the remaining line and wrap it around the barrel knot again, leaving 2 inches of line on the other side. Then, wrap the 2-inch line around the barrel knot again, leaving 2 inches of line on the other side. Place a small weight on the end of the line. This lure can be fished for large-mouth bass and bluegill.


How to Tie a Pro-Rig

A pro-rig is designed to be cast into the water and slowly reeled in. It’s often used to fish for large-mouth bass, bluegill, and pike. This lure can be tied using a 3- to 4-foot length of 4- or 6-pound test line. Then, take a 5-inch length of line and tie a barrel knot on each end. Next, take a 1-foot length of line and tie a swivel on each end. Take a 2-inch length of line and wrap it around the barrel knot that’s near the swivel, leaving 2 inches on the other side. Take the remaining line and wrap it around the other barrel knot, leaving 2 inches of line on the other side. Place a small weight on the end of the line. This lure can be fished for large-mouth bass, bluegill, and pike.


How to Tie a Swim Shrimp Lure

A swim shrimp lure is designed to be cast into the water and then slowly reeled in. It’s often used to fish for bass and bluegill. This lure is tied using a 3- to 4-foot length of 4- or 6-pound test line. Then, take a 5-inch length of line and tie a barrel knot on each end. Next, take a 1-foot length of line and tie a swivel on each end. Take a 2-inch length of line and wrap it around the barrel knot that’s near the swivel, leaving 2 inches on the other side. Take the remaining line and wrap it around the other barrel knot, leaving 2 inches of line on the other side. Place a small weight on the end of the line. This lure can be fished for bass and bluegill.


Conclusion

Fishing lures are the primary tools used by anglers to catch fish. Choosing the right lure will depend on the type of fish you’re after, the current, and the water depth. You also need to consider different types of lures, like crank-baits, spinners, and spoons. Hopefully, this article has helped you understand how to tie fishing lures better and how to select the right lure for your fishing trip.

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